"I do not want your admiration now, because I do not want your insults in the future. I bear with my loneliness now, in order to avoid greater loneliness in the years ahead. You see, loneliness is the price we have to pay for being born in this modern age, so full of freedom, independence, and our own egotistical selves."

Natsume Soseki, Kokoro (via vagabondedlife)

(Source: theforlornhope, via chibiemperorintj)

(Source: paris666hilton, via freshprinceoftsundere)

94,290 notes

(Source: sazkosh, via kakirigi)

119 notes

"

As we work, we sit more than we do anything else. We’re averaging 9.3 hours a day, compared to 7.7 hours of sleeping. Sitting is so prevalent and so pervasive that we don’t even question how much we’re doing it. And, everyone else is doing it also, so it doesn’t even occur to us that it’s not okay. In that way, I’ve come to see that sitting is the smoking of our generation.

Of course, health studies conclude that people should sit less, and get up and move around. After 1 hour of sitting, the production of enzymes that burn fat declines by as much as 90%. Extended sitting slows the body’s metabolism affecting things like (good cholesterol) HDL levels in our bodies. Research shows that this lack of physical activity is directly tied to 6% of the impact for heart diseases, 7% for type 2 diabetes, and 10% for breast cancer, or colon cancer. You might already know that the death rate associated with obesity in the US is now 35 million. But do you know what it is in relationship to Tobacco? Just 3.5 million. The New York Times reported on another study, published last year in the journal Circulation that looked at nearly 9,000 Australians and found that for each additional hour of television a person sat and watched per day, the risk of dying rose by 11%. In that article, a doctor is quoted as saying that excessive sitting, which he defines as nine hours a day, is a lethal activity.

"

Sitting Is the Smoking of Our Generation

Do yourself a favor and follow in the footsteps of Charles Dickens, Winston Churchill, Virginia Woolf, Ernest Hemingway, Philip Roth, Lewis Carroll, Thomas Jefferson, Fernando Pessoa and George Sand, who all worked standing.

(via ratak-monodosico)

(Source: , via chibiemperorintj)

408 notes

chibiemperorintj:

This is the 4-koma I made to remember Driesch’s Law (and its’s exception, Levi’s Law.)  …for some reason Driesch is a hyper kid and Levi’s a bit of an ass (or maybe just teasing? Or tired of Driesch being high all the time? Poor Levi lol)  Anyway I can’t use this during exams, but I can draw them as I study daily, to remember little details that my hippocampus sees fit to repel.

chibiemperorintj:

This is the 4-koma I made to remember Driesch’s Law (and its’s exception, Levi’s Law.)
…for some reason Driesch is a hyper kid and Levi’s a bit of an ass (or maybe just teasing? Or tired of Driesch being high all the time? Poor Levi lol)
Anyway I can’t use this during exams, but I can draw them as I study daily, to remember little details that my hippocampus sees fit to repel.

1 note

"[Parents should] recommend some books with female leads that your son would enjoy reading. If your next question is “Why?,” then ask your daughter why she liked Harry Potter. She might say it was a good story, great characters, and a fantastic world. Who cares if the main character was a boy? In fact, girls will pick up a book with a hero or heroine equally. According to my excellent librarian resources, boys will actively avoid books with a girl as the main character. What’s the problem? I have no idea. Why should you encourage your son to read books with heroines? That’s easy. You want your son to grow up knowing that a strong female for a friend, wife or boss is normal and good."

Rebecca Angel (via divinehours)

(Source: msandrogynous, via chibiemperorintj)

29,700 notes

chibiemperorintj:

ceravamoabbastanzaamati:

Grazie di esistere caffé :3

chibiemperorintj:

ceravamoabbastanzaamati:

Grazie di esistere caffé :3

(Source: coffeebooks)

147,842 notes

"[They] agreed that it was neither possible nor necessary to educate people who never questioned anything."

Joseph HellerCatch-22 (via lundsdotter)

(Source: quotablebookquotes, via chibiemperorintj)

795 notes

"It is true that I miss intelligent companionship, but there are so few with whom I can share the things that mean so much to me that I have learned to contain myself. It is enough that I am surrounded with beauty."

Jon Krakauer, Into the Wild  (via modernhepburn)

(Source: , via chibiemperorintj)

9,026 notes

"When I think of all the books still left for me to read, I am certain of further happiness."

Jules Renard (via bookaddictiion)

(via chibiemperorintj)

7,340 notes

stannisbaratheon:

@WorstMuse is a relic of the human race

(via booklover)

80,569 notes

endlesslibraries:

(via x)

endlesslibraries:

(via x)

(via booklover)

657 notes

darlingdahlia:

“In a good bookroom you feel in some mysterious way that you are absorbing the wisdom contained in all the books through your skin, without even opening them.”—Mark Twain

darlingdahlia:

In a good bookroom you feel in some mysterious way that you are absorbing the wisdom contained in all the books through your skin, without even opening them.—Mark Twain

(via chibiemperorintj)

4,376 notes

"The concept of an embryo is a staggering one, and forming an embryo is the hardest thing you will ever do. To become an Embryo, you had to build yourself from a single cell. You had to respire before you had lungs, digest before you had a gut, build bones when you were pulpy, and form orderly arrays of neurons before you knew how to think. One of the critical differences between you and a machine is that a machine is never required to function until after it is built. Every animal has to function even as it builds itself."

 Gilbert, Principles of developmental biology 8th edition (2006)

(Source: ohyeahdevelopmentalbiology, via chibiemperorintj)

1,864 notes

jtotheizzoe:

 The Floral X-rays of Brendan Fitzpatrick are just breathtaking. Check out more at the link.
Nature is full of numerical and geometric patterns, some we can see from the outside and some require that we take on a new perspective (just look at how those rose petals are stacked!!). Some of those patterns are probably coincidental, but some of them are likely a result of nature’s inner workings.
Want to explore more? Take a ride with Vi Hart through the mathematical patterns of pinecones, pineapples and flowers. And then discover the multitudes of mathematical patterns in nature with Cristóbal Vila’s amazing video Nature by Numbers.
What do you think? Are these patterns coincidental or are they proof of some inherent design rules in biology and nature?

jtotheizzoe:

The Floral X-rays of Brendan Fitzpatrick are just breathtaking. Check out more at the link.

Nature is full of numerical and geometric patterns, some we can see from the outside and some require that we take on a new perspective (just look at how those rose petals are stacked!!). Some of those patterns are probably coincidental, but some of them are likely a result of nature’s inner workings.

Want to explore more? Take a ride with Vi Hart through the mathematical patterns of pinecones, pineapples and flowers. And then discover the multitudes of mathematical patterns in nature with Cristóbal Vila’s amazing video Nature by Numbers.

What do you think? Are these patterns coincidental or are they proof of some inherent design rules in biology and nature?

(via chibiemperorintj)

1,228 notes